Please Remember in Your Prayers

Schema-Archimandrite Joachim; Archpriest Vincent Saverino; Archpriest Michael Hatrak; Archpriest John Vass; Deacon Michael Bishop; Mat. Myra Kovalak; Mat. Klavdiya Burbelo; Kh. Frederica Mathewes-Green; Nun Elizabeth; Nun Magdalena; Mat. Natalia Kosich; Mat. Diane Winsky; Mat. Catherine Kowalchik; Marie Vass; Charles Snipes; Arthur-Stephen Lisowsky; Yelena Radchenko; Lydia Zorina; Tatiana; Katherine Plaskowitz; Philip Plaskowitz, Michael Stanka; Bernadine Borawick; Julia Aymold; Mary Johnson; Olga Chanat; Lilli Ann Hoffman;       Lara Marinich; Oleg Marinich; Ioann and Galina Zernetkin; Monika-Anastasia & Stephanie Handley; Blanche-Julia Stolkovich; Ekaterina Koroleva; Nina Lewis; Maryann Black; Lyudmila, Anton & Aleksander Karnup; John Alexander Bylen; Katherine Garrett; Stephen Kaminitsky; Constantine; John-Thomas Planinshek; Kenneth Pukita; William and Ann Ferkile; Maria and Alexander Lozada; Sergei Krektyshev; Irina Kononova; Petr and Lyudmila Borodkin; Anthony and John Bakie; Svetlana & Aleksey; Nina; Mat. Galina, Alla; Anna; Alla; Raisa, Zinaida; Monk Maksim Krayushkin; Valentina; Joseph Germano; Pavel, Vladimir, Valentina, Nina, and Maria; Maria Pappas; Bonnie Duke; Joseph Lacomy; Diana Radchenko; Aleksey Potapov; Oleg and Andrei; Vitaliy, Tatiana, Olena & Nicholas Berchuk; Marian, Irena and Isabella; Kateryna Koshlaba; David, Selina-Sophia, John, Maryann, David, Joseph, Lisa Ann Eichelberger; Cynthia and Bill (Basil) Popomaronis; Katerina Spilio.

ru

Bulletin

19th Sunday after Pentecost

Tone 2

 

October 2/15, 2017

 

Hieromartyr Cyprian, Virgin-Martyr Justina and Martyr Theoctist of Nicomedia (304); Blessed Andrew, Fool-for-Christ at Constantinople (936); Righteous Theodore Ushakov, Admiral of the Russian Navy (1817); Venerable Anna of Kashin (1338); Venerable Cassian, Monk of Uglich (1504); Martyrs David and Constantine, Princes of Argveti, Georgia (740) (Georgia); Martyr Alexandra (1938).

 

Today’s Scriptural Readings:      

2 Corinthians 11:31 – 12:9   /   Luke 6: 31-36

Fr. John’s Sermons (Video): Click here  

 

We are at peace with Him, and we are so through virtue, much more will He be at peace with us. For He Who so loved us, as to show favor to us even against our will, will He not, if He sees us hastening toward Him, Himself yet much more exhibit His love toward us?    St. John Chrysostom

 

 

 

This  Week’s  Liturgical  Calendar

Saturday, October 21st

No services scheduled

Sunday, October 22nd9:00 AM

Divine Liturgy in Church

 

 

Divine Services at Holy Trinity are now live-streamed at

https://www.youtube.com/user/HolyTrinitySermons

 

 

 

Russian Festival 2017 – October 20, 21, 22

www.russfest.org 

 

O Holy Hierarch Tikhon, pray to God for us!

 

Troparion — Tone 1

Let us praise Tikhon, the patriarch of all Russia, / And enlightener of North America / An ardent follower of the Apostolic traditions, / And good pastor of the Church of Christ. / Who was elected by divine providence, / And laid down his life for his sheep. / Let us sing to him with faith and hope, / And ask for his hierarchical intercessions: / Keep the church in Russia in tranquility, / And the church in North America in peace. / Gather her scattered children into one flock, / Bring to repentance those who have renounced the True Faith, / Preserve our lands from civil strife, / And entreat God’s peace for all people!

 

 

FINAL  WEEK  OF  PREPARATIONS: October 15-20

Sunday, Oct. 15th – After Liturgy

1. Russian Tea Balls

2. Set-up Hall interior – need many volunteers

Tuesday, Oct. 17th

Installation of tent

Wednesday, Oct. 18th

Starting at 8 AM – All Day/Evening

Cooking various foods / Tent / Misc.

Need volunteers to set up security fences

Thursday, Oct. 19th

Starting at 8 AM – All Day/Evening

Cooking various foods throughout the morning / FINAL SET-UP: Hall and Tent – Afternoon/Evening

Friday, Oct. 20th

Festival Opens at 11 AM

ALL booths must be ready to serve by 10:30 AM

General questions, call Art Lisowsky 410-206-0073 artsky@juno.com

For Info on cooking call Albert Blaszak: 410-799-3226 or alb42@verizon.net.

 

 

Volunteers are encouraged to register their work times at http://www.russfest.org/volunteer.htm. This link will take you to a registration site. For those without internet access contact Natalie Burbelo 443-567-6031 nbsf49@verizon.net. Arrange your schedules ASAP.

 

Festival Desserts Table We need donations of desserts to supply our desserts table. We ask your help to increase both the quantity and variety of items. To promise your desserts please register at http://www.russfest.org/volunteer.htm. Or contact Tania Masiuk 410-987-4850, tania_masiuk@yahoo.com. 

 

Crock Pots – During the festival we use many crock pots at the various booths to keep the food warm. To keep our costs down, we request that people lend us their crock pots (size: 6-quart or larger) for use at the festival. Please bring your crock pot(s) (labeled with your name) to church by Sunday, Oct. 15th.

 

Facebook: Holy-Trinity-Russian-Festival – “Like us” & “Share”  Are you on Facebook?:  Go to our Facebook page (Holy-Trinity-Russian-Festival) “Like us” and “Share” the page. This will help us advertise the event. Pass it along to your friends as well.

 

Post-Festival Clean-up – Sunday evening we need volunteers who are well rested to help us clean up the hall at the conclusion of the festival. We especially ask those who aren’t volunteering much during the festival hours. Please contact Natalie Burbelo 443-567-6031 nbsf49@verizon.net. 

 

Russian Festival Attire:  All volunteers working at the festival will be required to wear either an official Russian Festival T-Shirt or traditional Russian Folk-style clothing – shirt, blouse, dress, etc. For more information contact Michael Mickel.

 

Remember…head coverings needed. All who are serving or working with food are required to wear head coverings – hair net, head scarf or hat/cap. No exceptions. Consult with your booth captain on the appropriate choice for your booth.

 

Please help us to cover the costs of our annual Russian Festival. Donations of any size are very much appreciated. May God bless you for your sincere generosity.  Please call Michael Mickel 410-666-2870 mcmickel@verizon.net or Albert Blaszak 410-799-3226 or alb42@verizon.net

 


Russian Festival Sponsorship List – 2017

$ 50 

Rice – Ludmila Karnup

$ 300

Wine – Michael Bosse

$ 60 

String Beans

$ 300

Wine – Cy/Sue Reshetiloff

$ 75 

Red Beets – Anysia Materewicz

  $ 300 

Vodka – Anonymous

$ 75 

Russian Candy – Marinich Children

  $ 300 

Vodka – Vadim/Yelena Radchenko

$ 100 

Cabbage – Marie Vass

$ 350 

Russian Beer – ½ of costs 

$ 100 

Coffee Supplies – Elizabeth Sanovich

$ 400 

Russian Beer – Gary Hudson

$ 150 

Eggs – Elena Artemova

$ 350 

Kolbasa – Roger/Ellen Miller

$ 150 

Potatoes – Daria/George Materewicz

$ 350 

Kolbasa – ½ of costs

$ 150 

Salmon – Richard/Rita Herber 

 $ 400 

Russian Ads

$ 100 

Sour Cream – Lilli Hoffman

$ 400 

Newspaper Ads

$ 100 

Beef – Tom Oldewurtel

$ 400 

Newspaper Ads

$ 175 

Sauerkraut – Roger/Ellen Miller

$ 400 

Electronic Ads

$ 200 

Cleaning Supplies

$ 500 

Security 

Evelyn Lisowsky for the health  and in honor of Art Lisowsky

$ 200 

Chicken – Claudette/Ted Gonter

$ 500 

Security 

 $ 200 

Chicken – ½ of costs

$ 500 

Beef

$ 200 

Butter – ½ of costs

$ 400 

Bread    ½ of costs – Tom Berry

$ 200 

Butter – ½ of costs

$ 600 

Bread – ½ of costs

$ 300 

Entertainment – Russ/Pat Disharoon

$ 600 

Wash Balalaika Soc – Russ/Pat Disharoon

$ 300 

Entertainment – 1/3 of costs

$ 600 

Wash Balalaika Soc. – Marty/Tania Masiuk

$ 300 

Entertainment – 1/3 of costs

$ 800 

Tent – ¼ of costs 

$ 300 

Paper Goods – ½ of costs

$ 800 

Tent – ¼ of costs

$ 300 

Paper Goods – ½ of costs

$ 800 

Tent – ¼ of costs 

$ 300 

Decorations

$ 800 

Tent – ¼ of costs

$ 300 

Flour – Glen & Nina Lewis

$ 1,000 

Stage – ½ of costs – Bonnie Duke

$ 300 

Flour – ½ of costs

$ 1,000 

Stage – ½ of costs



 

 

 

Sunday School Every Sunday

Dear Parents and Sunday School Teachers, it is important for all of our children to attend Divine Services and classes every Sunday. We parents teach our children about the importance of going to school every day in order do well in this life. So too, we must teach the importance of keeping the Lord’s day holy and of studying Scriptures and Church life, in order for them to know God and to inherit eternal life, a much loftier and crucial endeavor! Let us give them heavenly food for the soul…

 

Come to Holy Confession… Frequent Confession is important and necessary!

…let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of the bread and drink of the cup.

For he who eats and drinks in an unworthy manner eats and drinks judgment to himself,

not discerning the Lord’s body (1 Corinthians 11: 28-29).

 

 

Fall Fun Day – Saturday, November 4th – Mark your calendars

Holy Cross Antiochian Orthodox Church will host a Fall Fun Day on Saturday, November 4th beginning at 12:00 PM at our Holy Trinity Orthodox Cemetery (6480 Elibank Drive, Elkridge, MD 21075). All Baltimore area Orthodox Sunday School students and families are invited. The day will feature games and activities for kids of all ages. Families are asked to bring a garnish dish, snacks, desserts, cider, and hot chocolate to share. The event will conclude at 4:00 PM with Vespers in our Chapel. RSVP to Roxann Ashworth Roxann@cablespeed.com.

 

 

Wedding Invitation

Brian-Seraphim Cardell and Katherine Jeanette Page invite the Holy Trinity Family to join them for the celebration of their marriage on Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 2:00 PM in our church. A reception will follow the ceremony in the church hall. RSVP to Brian or Katherine directly or on their wedding web site www.withjoy.com/brianandkatherine by November 1.

 

 

Cleaning/Beautification of Icons Continues

BAS Decorative and Conservation Arts (http://www.byzantiumarts.com/) continues the restoration of the large icons on canvas. 

This work will include cleaning and enhancements to the beauty of the icons giving them a more transitional style closer to that of the iconostasis. 

 

We are accepting donations for the icon restoration work. Please visit our website to see pictures of the restoration work. And soon, we will attach posters, explanations and pledge forms on the website. To help with fundraising contact Tania Masiuk 410-987-4850, tania_masiuk@yahoo.com. To make a donation contact Vadim Radchenko 410-465-6172 vradchenko@comcast.net 

 

 

Birthday / Anniversary Celebrations:  October 15-28

We offer our best wishes and birthday congratulations to Samantha Tate (10/15); Natalie Blaszak and Ksenia McKenzie (10/17); Maddie Foss (10/18); Tony Bakie (10/19); Andrei Burbelo (10/28); and wedding anniversary congratulations to Victor & Jill Marinich (10/24) and Rdr. Joseph & Amy-Catherine McCusker (10/24). May God bless them with health, prosperity and many years. To include your birthdays/anniversaries contact Fr. John.

 

Vigil Candles: On the Altar and near St. Barbara

October 15-21:  Candles offered by the Bakie Family for the health/salvation of the servant of God: Anthony.

A $15 donation will keep all three candles lit for one week. Schedule your candle offering with Vadim Radchenko 410-465-6172. Thank you.

 

Cleaning Group – Group #3 /  Join a Group – Help your brothers and sisters

Group #3 will clean this week Oct. 16-21: Vadim (captain) and Yelena Radchenko,

Vladyslav and Natalia Volkova, Nadya Aleksandrovych This group needs more members. Any volunteers??

 

 

Submit your 2017 Pledge

Please be generous as the Lord is generous to you. Our church cannot operate without your financial contributions.

Our parish will grow only through your prayers, work and generous sacrifice.

He who sows sparingly will also reap sparingly,

and he who sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.   (2 Corinthians 9:6)

 

Please Remember in Your Prayers…

Schema-Archimandrite Joachim; Archpriest Vincent Saverino; Archpriest Michael Hatrak; Archpriest John Vass; Deacon Michael Bishop; Mat. Myra Kovalak; Mat. Klavdiya Burbelo; Kh. Frederica Mathewes-Green; Nun Elizabeth; Nun Magdalena; Mat. Natalia Kosich; Mat. Diane Winsky; Mat. Catherine Kowalchik; Marie Vass; Charles Snipes; Arthur-Stephen Lisowsky; Yelena Radchenko; Lydia Zorina; Tatiana; Katherine Plaskowitz; Philip Plaskowitz, Michael Stanka; Bernadine Borawick; Julia Aymold; Mary Johnson; Olga Chanat; Lilli Ann Hoffman;       Lara Marinich; Oleg Marinich; Ioann and Galina Zernetkin; Monika-Anastasia & Stephanie Handley; Blanche-Julia Stolkovich; Ekaterina Koroleva; Nina Lewis; Maryann Black; Lyudmila, Anton & Aleksander Karnup; John Alexander Bylen; Katherine Garrett; Stephen Kaminitsky; Constantine; John-Thomas Planinshek; Kenneth Pukita; William and Ann Ferkile; Maria and Alexander Lozada; Sergei Krektyshev; Irina Kononova; Petr and Lyudmila Borodkin; Anthony and John Bakie; Svetlana & Aleksey; Nina; Mat. Galina, Alla; Anna; Alla; Raisa, Zinaida; Monk Maksim Krayushkin; Valentina; Joseph Germano; Pavel, Vladimir, Valentina, Nina, and Maria; Maria Pappas; Bonnie Duke; Joseph Lacomy; Diana Radchenko; Aleksey Potapov; Oleg and Andrei; Vitaliy, Tatiana, Olena & Nicholas Berchuk; Marian, Irena and Isabella; Kateryna Koshlaba; David, Selina-Sophia, John, Maryann, David, Joseph, Lisa Ann Eichelberger; Cynthia and Bill (Basil) Popomaronis; Katerina Spilio. 

 

Next Council Meeting: Thursday, November 2nd – 7:00 PM in the Church Hall

 

Fr. John Vass, Pastor  410-997-0802

Fr. Deacon Michael Bishop:                        410-563-0472

Victor Marinich, Council President:          443-512-0985

Vadim Radchenko, Vice President:              410-465-6172

Andrei Burbelo,  Recording Secretary:    443-567-6031

Albert Blaszak, Treasurer:                             410-799-3226

Monika Handley, Stewardship Chair:      410-263-5758

Anna-Zumrat Shkurba, Member-At-Large: 443-857-8541

Natalie Burbelo, Sisterhood President:    443-567-6031

Michael Mickel, Cemetery Manager:             410-666-2870

 

 

St. Tikhon the Patriarch of Moscow, and Enlightener of North America

Patron Saint of the 2017 Russian Festival

 

Saint Tikhon, Patriarch of Moscow and Apostle to America was born as Vasily Ivanovich Belavin on January 19, 1865 into the family of Ioann Belavin, a rural priest of the Toropetz district of the Pskov diocese. His childhood and adolescence were spent in the village in direct contact with peasants and their labor. From his early years he displayed a particular religious disposition, love for the Church as well as rare meekness and humility. 

 

When Vasily was still a boy, his father had a revelation about each of his children. One night, when he and his three sons slept in the hayloft, he suddenly woke up and roused them. He had seen his dead mother in a dream, who foretold to him his imminent death, and the fate of his three sons. She said that one would be unfortunate throughout his entire life, another would die young, while the third, Vasily, would be a great man. The prophecy of the dead woman proved to be entirely accurate in regard to all three brothers.

 

From 1878 to 1883, Vasily studied at the Pskov Theological Seminary. The modest seminarian was tender and affectionate by nature. He was fair-haired and tall of stature. His fellow students liked and respected him for his piety, brilliant progress in studies, and constant readiness to help comrades, who often turned to him for explanations of lessons, especially for help in drawing up and correcting numerous compositions. Vasily was called “bishop” and “patriarch” by his classmates.

 

In 1888, at the age of 23, Vasily Belavin graduated from the Saint Petersburg Theological Academy as a layman, and returned to the Pskov Seminary as an instructor of Moral and Dogmatic Theology. The whole seminary and the town of Pskov became very fond of him. He led an austere and chaste life, and in 1891, when he turned 26, he took monastic vows. Nearly the whole town gathered for the ceremony. He embarked on this new way of life consciously and deliberately, desiring to dedicate himself entirely to the service of the Church. The meek and humble young man was given the name Tikhon in honor of Saint Tikhon of Zadonsk. 

 

He was transferred from the Pskov Seminary to the Kholm Theological Seminary in 1892, and was raised to the rank of archimandrite. Archimandrite Tikhon was consecrated Bishop of Lublin on October 19, 1897, and returned to Kholm for a year as Vicar Bishop of the Kholm Diocese. Bishop Tikhon zealously devoted his energy to the establishment of the new vicariate. His attractive moral make-up won the general affection, of not only the Russian population, but also of the Lithuanians and Poles. On September 14, 1898, Bishop Tikhon was made Bishop of the Aleutians and Alaska. As head of the Orthodox Church in America, Bishop Tikhon was a zealous laborer in the Lord’s vineyard. 

 

He did much to promote the spread of Orthodoxy, and to improve his vast diocese. He reorganized the diocesan structure, and changed its name from “Diocese of the Aleutians and Alaska” to “Diocese of the Aleutians and North America” in 1900. Both clergy and laity loved their archpastor, and held him in such esteem that the Americans made Archbishop Tikhon an honorary citizen of the United States.

 

On May 22, 1901, he blessed the cornerstone for Saint Nicholas Cathedral in New York, and was also involved in establishing other churches. On November 9, 1902, he consecrated the church of Saint Nicholas in Brooklyn for the Syrian Orthodox immigrants. Two weeks later, he consecrated Saint Nicholas Cathedral in NY.

 

In 1905, the American Mission was made an Archdiocese, and Saint Tikhon was elevated to the rank of Archbishop. He had two vicar bishops: Bishop Innocent (Pustynsky) in Alaska, and Saint Raphael (Hawaweeny) in Brooklyn to assist him in administering his large, ethnically diverse diocese. In June of 1905, Saint Tikhon gave his blessing for the establishment of Saint Tikhon’s Monastery.

 

In 1907, he returned to Russia, and was appointed to Yaroslavl, where he quickly won the affection of his flock. They came to love him as a friendly, communicative, and wise archpastor. He spoke simply to his subordinates, never resorting to a peremptory or overbearing tone. When he had to reprimand someone, he did so in a good-natured, sometimes joking manner, which encouraged the person to correct his mistakes. 

 

When Saint Tikhon was transferred to Lithuania on December 22, 1913, the people of Yaroslavl voted him an honorary citizen of their town. After his transfer to Vilna, he did much in terms of material support for various charitable institutions. There too, his generous soul and love of people clearly manifested themselves. World War I broke out when His Eminence was in Vilna. He spared no effort to help the poor residents of the Vilna region who were left without a roof over their heads or means of subsistence as a result of the war with the Germans, and who flocked to their archpastor in droves.

 

After the February Revolution and formation of a new Synod, Saint Tikhon became one of its members. On June 21, 1917, the Moscow Diocesan Congress of clergy and laity elected him as their ruling bishop. He was a zealous and educated archpastor, widely known even outside his country.

 

On August 15, 1917, a local council was opened in Moscow, and Archbishop Tikhon was raised to the dignity of Metropolitan, and then elected as chairman of the council. The council had as its aim to restore the life of Russian Orthodox Church on strictly canonical principles, and its primary concern was the restoration of the Patriarchate. All council members would select three candidates, and then a lot would reveal the will of God. The council members chose three candidates: Archbishop Anthony of Kharkov, the wisest, Archbishop Arseny of Novgorod, the strictest, and Metropolitan Tikhon of Moscow, the kindest of the Russian hierarchs. 

 

On November 5, following the Divine Liturgy and a Molieben in the Cathedral of Christ the Savior, a monk removed one of the three ballots from the ballot box, which stood before the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God. Metropolitan Vladimir of Kiev announced Metropolitan Tikhon as the newly elected Patriarch. Saint Tikhon did not change after becoming the primate of the Russian Orthodox Church. In accepting the will of the council, Patriarch Tikhon referred to the scroll that the Prophet Ezekiel had to eat, on which was written, “Lamentations, mourning, and woe.” He foresaw that his ministry would be filled with affliction and tears, but through all his suffering, he remained the same accessible, unassuming, and kindly person.

 

All who met Saint Tikhon were surprised by his accessibility, simplicity and modesty. His gentle disposition did not prevent him from showing firmness in Church matters, however, particularly when he had to defend the Church from her enemies. He bore a very heavy cross. He had to administer and direct the Church amidst wholesale church disorganization, without auxiliary administrative bodies, in conditions of internal schisms and upheavals by various adherents of the Living Church, renovationists, and autocephalists.

 

The situation was complicated by external circumstances: the change of the political system, by the accession to power of the godless regime, by hunger, and civil war. This was a time when Church property was being confiscated, when clergy were subjected to court trials and persecutions, and Christ’s Church endured repression. News of this came to the Patriarch from all ends of Russia. His exceptionally high moral and religious authority helped him to unite the scattered and enfeebled flock. At a crucial time for the church, his unblemished name was a bright beacon pointing the way to the truth of Orthodoxy. In his messages, he called on people to fulfill the commandments of Christ, and to attain spiritual rebirth through repentance. His irreproachable life was an example to all.

 

In order to save thousands of lives and to improve the general position of the church, the Patriarch took measures to prevent clergy from making purely political statements. On September 25, 1919, when the civil war was at its height, he issued a message to the clergy urging them to stay away from political struggle.

 

The summer of 1921 brought a severe famine to the Volga region. In August, Patriarch Tikhon issued a message to the Russian people and to the people of the world, calling them to help famine victims. He gave his blessing for voluntary donations of church valuables, which were not directly used in liturgical services. However, on February 23, 1922, the All-Russian Central Executive Committee published a decree making all valuables subject to confiscation. 

 

According to the 73rd Apostolic Canon, such actions were regarded as sacrilege, and the Patriarch could not approve such total confiscation, especially since many doubted that the valuables would be used to combat famine. This forcible confiscation aroused popular indignation everywhere. Nearly two thousand trials were staged all over Russia, and more than ten thousand believers were shot. The Patriarch’s message was viewed as sabotage, for which he was imprisoned from April 1922 until June 1923.

 

His Holiness, Patriarch Tikhon did much on behalf of the Russian Orthodox Church during the crucial time of the so-called Renovationist schism. He showed himself to be a faithful servant and custodian of the undistorted precepts of the true Orthodox Church. He was the living embodiment of Orthodoxy, which was unconsciously recognized even by enemies of the church, who called its members “Tikhonites.”

 

When Renovationist priests and hierarchs repented and returned to the church, they were met with tenderness and love by Saint Tikhon. This, however, did not represent any deviation from his strictly Orthodox policy. “I ask you to believe me that I will not come to agreement or make concessions which could lead to the loss of the purity and strength of Orthodoxy,” the Patriarch said in 1924. 

 

Being a good pastor, who devoted himself entirely to the church’s cause, he called upon the clergy to do the same: “Devote all your energy to preaching the word of God and the truth of Christ, especially today, when unbelief and atheism are audaciously attacking the Church of Christ. May the God of peace and love be with you!”

 

It was extremely painful and hard for the Patriarch’s loving, responsive heart to endure all the Church’s misfortunes. Upheavals in and outside the church, the Renovationist schism, his primatial labors, his concern for the organization and tranquility of Church life, sleepless nights and heavy thoughts, his confinement that lasted more than a year, the spiteful and wicked baiting of his enemies, and the unrelenting criticism sometimes even from the Orthodox, combined to undermine his strength and health.

 

In 1924, Patriarch Tikhon began to feel unwell. He checked into a hospital, but would leave it on Sundays and Feast Days in order to conduct services. On Sunday, April 5, 1925, he served his last Liturgy, and died two days later. On March 25/April 7, 1925 the Patriarch received Metropolitan Peter and had a long talk with him. In the evening, the Patriarch slept a little, then he woke up and asked what time it was. When he was told it was 11:45 P.M., he made the Sign of the Cross twice and said, “Glory to Thee, O Lord, glory to Thee.” He did not have time to cross himself a third time.

 

Almost a million people came to say farewell to the Patriarch. The large cathedral of the Donskoy Monastery in Moscow could not contain the crowd, which overflowed the monastery property into the square and adjacent streets. Saint Tikhon, the eleventh Patriarch of Moscow, was primate of the Russian Church for seven and a half years.

 

On September 26/October 9, 1989, the Council of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church glorified Patriarch Tikhon and numbered him among the saints. For nearly seventy years, Saint Tikhon’s relics were believed lost, but in February 1992, they were discovered in a concealed place in the Donskoy Monastery.

 

It would be difficult to imagine the Russian Orthodox Church without Patriarch Tikhon during those years. He did so much for the Church and for the strengthening of the Faith itself during those difficult years of trial. Perhaps the saint’s own words can best sum up his life: “May God teach every one of us to strive for His truth, and for the good of the Holy Church, rather than something for our own sake.”  Courtesy of www.oca.org

 

O Most Holy Trinity, Our God, Glory to Thee!